TVS Radeon Ride Test Review
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TVS Radeon Review

Bike Tested: TVS Radeon; Road Test No. 1035; Test Location: Mumbai

Price OTR Mumbai: Rs. 63,200/-

The Radeon is yet another brilliant offering from TVS for the commuter market

I have been riding the Apache RR 310 for quite some time and TVS had the latest offering in the commuter segment ready for review. So I swapped it for a week and to my surprise, I didn’t know whether this decision was going to be good or not. Glad to say it was more efficient and exciting than I could have ever imagined. For starters, in the last 7 days, I rode it for around 300 kms and filled fuel just once when the bike came! But is the TVS Radeon up to the mark and ready to face the competition it already has?

Motor Quest: The Radeon is based out of an existing TVS model, the Star City+. It comes with an all-new design and stiffer suspension setup. However, the underpinning stay the same as the Star City+ while it gets larger alloy wheels.

The TVS Radeon gets a lot of chrome treatment all over

Styling – The design of the TVS Radeon goes very well with the existing competition. But it stands out due to the bright colour scheme and enhanced use of chrome at various places. The headlight cover, crash guard, the whole exhaust, suspension cover, luggage holder and even the grab rail is finished in chrome. Matte black shade on the engine with a golden cover for the oil sump looks nice too. The Radeon also gets a bright DRL upfront and our test bike was in the gloss white shade which grabbed a lot of attention. As we speak, attention to detail with a rubber tank pad and TVS Radeon logo in 3D adds a nice touch to the motorcycle. It grabs a good amount of attention which I never expected. So much so, that a few people actually stopped me to ask which bike is it!

A very simple analogue unit does duty for the instrument cluster

Instrument Cluster and Switchgear – The TVS Radeon gets a very simple yet attractive looking instrument cluster. It is an analogue unit but the design is so similar that it reminds me of the one which the Brezza gets! Dual pods do the job here while the right one has a fuel gauge and a side stand indicator. The left one includes the speedometer and economy and power mode LEDs. The centre area consists of a few more tell-tale lights with the TVS logo on top. The cluster is fairly simple but looks really nice for a bike like this. The switchgear has somewhat of a piano black finish and they go very well with the bike. It does not get a kill switch but a headlight switch is present to switch between the DRL and the headlight.