Analogue-digital console with the tiniest digital odometer

Instrument Cluster and Switchgear – This is one of the most basic clusters I have seen in a very long time. Jawa has tried hard to stick to their older pattern but with a vertical placement angle this sometimes gets difficult to read and it even fogs up. It displays 3 basic information – the speedometer, fuel gauge and odometer. The needles rotate clockwise, but it feels completely opposite to a normal viewer. As badging is important, the handlebar grips get the Jawa logo embedded in them and the chrome bar ends to carry forward the classic look. The switches are easily accessible and the plastic does not feel cheap.

The motorcycle is perfect for solo riding, pillion duties are slightly risky

Ergonomics – In terms of ergonomics, this bike nails it as the seat height is at a low 765 mm which makes it accessible for shorter riders too. The footpegs are slightly front-set while the seating posture is upright with a shorter handlebar. The ergonomic triangle is comfortable and very likeable for an average Indian height person but any taller and the bike will feel too small. The seat cushioning isn’t the best and the seat isn’t long either but one can manage to sit a pillion.

The seat is hard yet wide but with a pillion it will be a snug-fit

There are no grab rails too which might bother the pillion and they would have to hold on to the rider. The key placement also is below the handlebar and above the radiator making it quite an effort. The handle locking area is also tucked under the cone-set area. There were a few moments when I forgot to unlock the handlebar and just started the bike. The mirrors are round in shape and have a chrome finish for that classic look. However, they don’t serve the purpose just as well.